Veterans Day 2018

Veterans Day is intended to thank all those who honorably served in the military – in war time or peace time.

Veterans Day is observed every year on November 11th. Veterans Day was originally called “Armistice Day” when President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed this day in November 1919. Armistice is when warring parties agree to stop fighting and “Armistice Day” recognizes the end of World War 1 when hostilities ceased on November 11th at 11 A.M, 1918 (11th hour, of the 11th, of the 11th month).

On May 13th, 1938 Armistice Day was declared a legal holiday each year. A day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace. Originally Armistice Day only honored veterans of World War.

On November 11th, 1947 Raymond Weeks, a World War II veteran, organized a “National Veterans Day” parade in Birmingham, Alabama to recognize veterans of all wars.

This celebration led to Congress changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day in 1954 to recognize Veterans of all U.S. wars.

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Veterans Day Facts

Military Discount Center, Deals and Discounts

American Legion Centennial Highlighted in 2019 Farmer’s Almanac

American Legion Centennial Highlighted in 2019 Farmer’s Almanac

Farmers Almanac 2019 Celebrates Legion CentennialThe 2019 issue of the Harris Farmer’s Almanac salutes The American Legion with a one-page article recognizing the organization’s 100th anniversary. Now on sale nationally, the annual collection of weather forecasts, notable events, predictions, gardening hints and more also profiles in the same issue Moina Michael, the so-called “Poppy Lady” who fueled U.S. attention on the flower and its meaning as a symbol for the fallen of World War I.

In the article “A Salute to The American Legion,” writer Veda Boyd Jones notes several of the organization’s accomplishments over the last century, including American Legion Baseball, Boys State, establishment of the Veterans Bureau, predecessor to the VA, and the 1944 GI Bill, as well as the Legion’s support for the most recent update of it, the Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2017.

Read more on the American Legion’s website.

National Poppy Day

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National Poppy Day:

The American Legion has the support of Congress to designate the Friday before Memorial Day as National Poppy Day, a day that encourages all Americans to wear a red poppy as a symbol to honor the fallen and support the living heroes who have worn our nation’s uniform.

After World War I, the poppy flourished in Europe. scientists attributed the growth to soils in France and Belgium becoming enriched with lime from the rubble left by the war. the red poppy came to symbolize the blood shed by those who fought and those who continue to fight for our country following the publication of the wartime poem In Flanders Fields.  The poem was written by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, M.D. while serving on the front line in World War I, to honor soldiers killed in battle.

The poppy became the memorial flower of the American Legion on September 27, 1920 in Cleveland, Ohio.

National Poppy Day is an initiative supported by the entire American Legion Family, which includes The American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary, Sons of The American Legion, and the American Legion Riders.

Each year, members of The American Legion Family, led by The American Legion Auxiliary, distribute poppies with a request that the person receiving the flower make a donation. Proceeds from the sale of items such as jewelry and other themed merchandise also benefit the mission to support the future of veterans, active-duty military personnel and their families with medical and financial needs.

Post Namesake Memorial Anniversary

May he be forever remembered!

Army Cpl. Peter J. Courcy

Died February 2009 Serving in Operation Enduring Freedom


22, of Frisco, Texas; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.; died Feb. 10 in Salerno, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle.


From an article by Chris Smith of The Leaf-Chronicle

Two 101st Airborne Division soldiers died Tuesday when an improvised explosive device exploded near their vehicle in Salerno, Afghanistan.

Spc. Peter J. Courcy, 22, of Frisco, Texas, and Pfc. Jason R. Watson, 19, of Many, La., died in Salerno from their injuries, according to a news release Thursday from the Department of Defense.

The soldiers were assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, based at Fort Campbell.

According to a Fort Campbell media release, Courcy was an infantryman who entered the Army in July 2006 and arrived at Fort Campbell in March 2007. His awards and decorations include: the Army Achievement Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Army Service Ribbon; Air Assault Badge; Parachutist Badge and Weapons Qualification, M4, expert.

Courcy is survived by his wife, Mara, of Colony, Texas; son, Anthony Luke, of Frisco, Texas; mother and step-father, Mary and Christopher Bush, of Frisco, Texas; and father, Jon Mitchell.


From The Associated Press

Peter J. Courcy’s best friend, Otto Bauer, laughed as he remembered meeting Peter in 2001 on a school bus.

“He was one of a kind, and we just hit it off right away and quickly became close,” Bauer said. “He was always a goofy kid and had a strong personality.”

Courcy, 22, of Frisco, Texas, was killed Feb. 10 by a suicide car bomb in Salerno. He was assigned to Fort Campbell.

Courcy’s former principal remembers his upbeat presence and fervor for life. “He was a good student, but he was an even better person,” Rick Burnett said. “That was reflective in the fact that he served his country.”

After graduating in 2004, he played amateur hockey for the Dallas Ice Hawks while taking classes at community colleges until enlisting in 2006.

“We always knew that’s what he wanted and needed,” said his father, Chris. “He needed to be in the Army just as much as the Army needed him, and he thrived there.”

He was a Dallas Cowboys nut and signed on for another five years of service, hoping to join the Special Forces.

Happy 108th Birthday Boy Scouts

Post 178 is proud to wish our scouts a Happy 108th Birthday

Pack 178 Troop 178 Crew 178

The Boy Scouts of America – one hundred years young and still going strong! Celebrate the adventure and continue the journey as Scouting launches its 108th year.

BSABirthdayCakeMB
IT ALL BEGAN IN A FOG

While walking the misty streets of London in 1909, American businessman William Boyce lost his way. A boy offered to guide him to his destination. Boyce wanted to pay him, but the boy explained that he was a Scout, and that Scouts do not accept money for doing good turns.

BoyceInTheFog
Eager to learn more, Mr. Boyce met with Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scout movement in Great Britain. Boyce knew that boys back home would like the idea, so he brought Scouting to the United States. Papers incorporating the Boy Scouts of America were signed on February 8, 1910 – the date celebrated as the official birthday of the BSA.